Out with the old and in with the new?


You may think that this latter part of the year means cutting and clearing away dead plants and leaves making for a dreary and deserted landscape. But it needn't be! There are plenty of things you can do to put some life and colour into your outdoor spaces.

Planting violas, winter-flowering pansies and forget-me-nots now will be certain to add a bit of colour throughout the coming months. You may also wish to fill any empty pots or beds with winter vegetable seeds such as onions and shallots, garlic, peas and asparagus, to name but a few.

If you still have certain flora that have decided to stick around for a little while longer, it may be the time to cut them down. When shrubs begin to yellow and their stems wilt, it’s a sign that they are drawing their sap back into their roots. If they are not cut down during this period of time, they may decay.

On the other hand, if they look like they're going to brave the coming cold, you may decide to leave them be. Left to their own devices, some plants continue to grow through the winter, giving your garden a bit of wild character.


Don’t neglect the lawn

Dead leaves can lead to a pristine lawns’ demise if not dealt with quickly. With limited and weak sunshine already partially affecting the growth of grass, having light blocked by ground leaves is going to make things worse. Consistently clear these leaves to avoid dry, brown patches and moss growth, whilst contributing to your compost or mulch heap(s).

We suggest, if you don’t already own one, investing in a lawn mower that can be height adjusted, (self-propelled petrol mowersmake for the easiest mowing) as different lengths of grass at different times of the year can produce different results. For these particular cooler months, cutting your grass no shorter than 5cm means it can make better use of the available sunlight, ensuring better resistance against weeds and moss.


Don’t forget to fertilise

We also recommend using an autumn fertiliser. These fertilisers contain higher amounts of potassium, which can protect grass against frost by giving it extra strength. The low nitrogen content doesn't allow the grass to grow too quickly, as this would make it more defenceless in those frosty Winter mornings.